Words and Images from Ed Felker

Posts tagged “dog

Nine.

DSC_3780 copy

At some point between her last birthday and today, according to the dog to human years conversion charts, Winnie passed me in age. It’s hard to believe it’s been nine years. I can still remember when her puppy feet smelled like Frito’s and her sweet breath on my face was my favorite thing. Nine years later, I love her to death but it’s not very often that any aroma originating from Winnie brings me unbridled joy like those puppy months so long ago.

I can’t remember a time when she didn’t understand exactly what I expected of her. I have very little memory of training her, actually, but she ended up smart and incredibly obedient. It’s odd, I think of her not as a very well trained dog, but more just like a friend who ‘gets’ me.

Over the years she’s gotten more set in her ways, more quirky I guess. She likes to play, but rarely, and can’t be enticed into it. If she’s in the mood, she’ll bat Winslow or Petey around until they chase her. Otherwise, she wants to be left alone. She’s more like me than any other dog in my life, past or present.

Sometimes when I let all the dogs out of their crates at the end of the day, in the midst of the frenzy of freedom, she prefers to hang out a bit longer in her crate until the others have gone outside. Then at her leisure she’ll wander into the kitchen and say hi, one of many private moments with me that she has learned to sneak when she can.

Her favorite thing to do in the world is to go out with me on the kayak, so for the last several years we’ve been doing that on her birthday, just the two of us. When the realization hits her that she’s coming with me, and nobody else is, she jumps around next to the truck like she’s a puppy again.

When I get to the ramp she is impatient with the process of getting gear ready. “Oh my GOD, just put the boat in the water and let’s GO!” She sits in her spot in the front of the kayak and makes her little Chewbaca noises until the truck is parked and we’re ready to shove off. Then the moment that last bit of concrete ramp slides away from under the boat and we become silently buoyant, I can see every muscle in her body relax. She puts her head down and just watches the water. She’s content for hours.

Today we saw juvenile bald eagles playing or practicing eagle things above our heads. I watched Great Blue Herons wading in the muddy shallows and thought of those ancient, bird-like dinosaurs that left similar tracks so long ago. And when we got back to the ramp, she didn’t want to leave. I packed everything up, fetched the truck and backed it down the ramp, giving her till the last possible minute before she had to turn away from the river.

She rode home doing something else she loves to do, hang her head out the window. Warm air from outside mixed and swirled with air conditioning and that pungent, wet dog smell. And you know what? Yeah, I inhaled a big, full breath of it through my nose, and smiled.

1.jpeg copy


Winslow Loves Loudoun

winslowloudoun1

Inexplicably, I have not yet written a blog post here on Dispatches about Winslow, my special little wirehaired dachshund. Winslow (admittedly with my incessant promotion) has become a local celebrity of sorts here in Loudoun County, Virginia. His arrival was marked nationally with an introduction on the Orvis Dog Blog. Locally his gift for promoting local businesses was tapped as Loudoun County Economic Development featured him in their Takeover Tuesday campaign, where he took charge of their Instagram account for a day. He was then featured in the Loudoun Times-Mirror in a must-read piece about his performance as the youngest participant in our town of Lovettsville’s Oktoberfest Weiner Dog Races.

Visit Loudoun, the voice for our county’s tourism, recently launched a #loveloudoun campaign wherein prominent residents would share things they love about our great county. Winslow was interviewed for the project, and his episode of the series on social media was extremely popular, quickly gathering well over a thousand Likes on Facebook.

But due to space limitations, Winslow’s endearing interview could not be shared in its entirety. So with Visit Loudoun’s (and Winslow’s) permission, the full text of the interview is shared below. Enjoy!

wirydogs

Visit Loudoun: How long have you lived in Loudoun?
Winslow: I was born in Hungary but moved to Loudoun when I was 8 weeks old. I’m almost a year old now, so… well I can’t do the math but I’ve lived here almost my whole life.

VL: What was your first impression of Loudoun?
W: Well, like everyone I assume, I notice smells more than anything. And wherever we go, there are so many wonderful smells, from woods and fields and creeks and animals, to the amazing smells coming from delicious restaurants and backyard cookouts.

VL: What do you like to do in Loudoun your free time?
W: Dig. I dig a lot. The soil here, I don’t know, there’s just something about it. Can’t get enough. In fact, can we cut this short? I’d kinda like to get back to it.

VL: Describe a perfect spring or summer day in Loudoun.
W: Oh that’s easy. Wake up early. REALLY early. Make sure everyone is up. Then I like to have a big bowl of breakfast and go for a long walk in the woods with my canine sister and brothers. After that, I love to go to those places where there are happy people and other happy dogs and they make beer. I get a lot of attention, which if I’m being honest, is pretty neat.  But being out at a place makes me tired, so even though it’s fun, I’m most happy when it’s time to go home and rest on the couch. I can get on the couch by myself now, by the way, I’m pretty proud of that if you want to include that in your story.

VL: What’s your best Loudoun memory?
W: My best Loudoun memory was my first Wienerdog Race at the Lovettsville Oktoberfest! There were SO many people there and they chanted my name! I won the race and everyone was so happy for me even though I lost the next one. But if I never win another race in my life, I will never forget that special day when it felt like the entire town loved me.

VL: What is your favorite place in Loudoun and why?
W: Well I’m not gonna lie, I love all the beer making places that allow me on the patio. Everyone is so cheerful, some of them make dog cookies out of their beer making stuff, some have fires when it gets chilly out, and they all put fresh water bowls out (I’m not old enough to drink beer yet). But my absolute favorite place is home. I’m the youngest in a five-dog household, and we all get along great. We run around a lot, dig of course, and when we ruin a toy, a brand new better toy just shows up the next day! But my Mom and Dad love living here, and they make it a wonderful place for us dogs.

VL: What would you consider to be Loudoun’s best kept secret?
W: Gosh I don’t know what’s a secret. Did you know there’s a river, like right there? And there’s a great big hike called Loudoun Heights but let me warn you, if you have short legs like me there are some awful big rocks to go over. And did you know if you peek your head up so the lady at the drive thru at the bank in Lovettsville can see you, she’ll send a cookie through the wall?

VL: What do you like most about the people who live here?
W: When we go to a crowded place I notice that people here seem to be kind and happy and very welcoming to me. I don’t know if they even know I’m from another country but they don’t seem to care. And sometimes people I’ve never met before recognize me from seeing me on the computer! That’s the best. They say stuff like, “Oh my God is that Winslow??” And my Dad gets so proud and says, “It sure is!”

VL: If you moved away, what would be the one thing you would miss?
W: I would miss our home, but homes with long driveways and birds to chase and holes to dig can be found elsewhere I suppose. I’ve made friends here that I know love me as much as I love them, though. That’s what I would miss most. I even have girlfriends! My Dad says you aren’t supposed to have more than one so don’t tell Sarah and Kellie about that if you don’t mind.

winslowloudoun2


2015 Photos of the Year

I enjoyed going through my photographs of 2015 and picking out my top twenty. The annual exercise serves as a reminder of special places, fascinating people and amazing wildlife encountered over the past twelve months. All but two of the photos this year were taken in Virginia. One of the exceptions is the first image, below, showing Patrick Fulkrod of the South Holston River Company releasing a brown trout into the cool waters of the Watauga River in Tennessee.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

While I didn’t hand raise any Monarch butterflies this year, I watched dozens of these beauties go through their magical life cycles on my milkweed plants. I caught this female emerging from her chrysalis, and watched her with my camera as she unfolded wings of flame.

DSC_3071 copy

Dove hunting with friends has become a favorite new tradition each fall. And when the hunting is slow, as it was for me this year, you can always work on your still life photography. A well used Winchester Model 12, a fine Orvis case and the only dove of the day combined for, to me anyway, a calming blend of textures and colors.

DSC_3120 copy

This copperhead ventured a little too far out into the travel lane to soak up some early morning warmth stored in the asphalt. He is deceased. But it’s the first one I’ve gotten to see up close, so I felt compelled to photograph him.

DSC_3192 copy

Ed Clark of the Wildlife Center of Virginia released this red-tailed hawk after many, many months of rehabilitation. The bird, ill with severe lead poisoning, by all accounts should have died. But when Ed and his staff encounter an animal with an extraordinary will to survive, they join in the fight, and are committed to doing everything in their power to help.

DSC_2440 copy

At a birthday party for my friend, these kids jumped around under an amazing evening sky.

DSC_0969edit copy

I saw more black bear in 2015 than in all other years combined. This youngster watched traffic go by along Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park.

DSC_3418crop copy

The Washington, DC area was treated to a unique spectacle this summer as dozens of WWII era war planes gathered in formations and flew over the region in the Arsenal of Democracy Flyover. I have much closer shots of the planes, but I thought this image of a couple watching the distant plane had a vintage feel to it that suited the day.

5

Naturalist Brian Balik and I spent some early fall mornings cruising Skyline Drive in search of wildlife. But even when the animals aren’t cooperating, the scenery never disappoints.

DSC_4018 copy

While photographing the Middleburg Hunt before the Christmas parade, I was lucky to capture Devon Zebrovious making this elegant turn, resulting in one of my all time favorite portraits.

DSC_5271 copy

Speaking of models, my friend Joel Thompson of Montana Troutaholics is the most photogenic person I know. I loved this relaxed shot of him taking a break from brook trout fishing along the Rapidan River. That Pelican cooler has traveled all over Virginia this past year, which is particularly cool because I just learned that Pelican is actually a Virginia-based company.

DSC_5942editlow

I spent a lot of time looking for reptiles to photograph this year, but I spotted this beautiful northern water snake while trout fishing. Luckily I had my camera handy and captured this image in early morning dappled sunlight.

DSC_7631edit

My wirehaired Vizsla, Winnie, reflects on her reflection at Rose River Farm. There are more favorite dog photos of the year in this earlier post.

DSC_2381orvis

This five-lined skink, warm from the sun, moved very quickly. But I lucked out and got this cool shot of the beautiful critter.

DSC_9232 copy

This was a great year for turkey sightings where I live. These two composed themselves perfectly for a nice shot along our driveway. Carrying a camera in the truck almost every day has resulted in far more photographic opportunities this year.

DSC_9502 copy

On assignment covering the dedication of a home built for a combat wounded hometown hero, I quickly walked past this cool scene of waiting escorts and kept thinking about it. I was glad they were still there when I went back to photograph them.

DSC_0103 copy

Frog eggs, probably from a wood frog, sit just below the surface of a vernal pool.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Low light is the bane of my photography. But every now and then I capture an image I really like, and sometimes it only takes a couple hundred snaps of the shutter to get a keeper. Dominion Power lines create an interesting composition on this lightning shot.

lightning edit V3

Owl sightings are rare for me, so any time I see one is a special occasion. I spotted this Great Horned owl at nightfall and was thrilled to have my camera with me at the time. The light was obviously limiting, but every now and then a silhouette is just what a scene calls for.

owl

I struggled shooting this sunflower field with photographer Martin Radigan, but love the mood of this one keeper from the evening. I look forward to trying this again next year.

sunflowers 1 copy

I am thankful for everyone who takes the time to read this blog, and I hope you enjoy this collection of my favorite shots of the year. Let me know your favorite in the comments!


Kindreds

babyPbabyD 3This young deer has been hanging around for a few weeks, often very close to the house. This morning he was bedded down in the pine needles between our two fences here, a place protected from falling snow because of the evergreens above. When he saw the dogs run into the yard, he stood up and ran toward the fence! Petey and the deer seemed to share some sort of connection as they played, sniffed and postured through the fence wire.
babyPbabyD 1

babyPbabyD 2


%d bloggers like this: